News

  • Feb 13
    2018
    Facing a daunting, digital pile millions of photographs high, how would you find the few images you need? Could you, even? It’s a classic needle-in-a-haystack conundrum, and it’s a blaring reality for ecologists, resource managers and farmers who use camera traps to track wildlife. Consider Sedgwick Ranch Reserve, part of UC Santa Barbara’s Natural Reserve System. A... read more »
  • Feb 2
    2018
      For more than two weeks in December, ash particles swirled like snowflakes across much of Santa Barbara County, blanketing the area in a dusting of grayish-white. N95 particulate masks became a ubiquitous sight as people donned them for respiratory protection, wondering — and worrying — just what those ashes contained. Now scientists at UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of... read more »
  • Feb 1
    2018
    IEE has released it's quarterly newsletter featuring news and research from November 2017 through January 2018. View the full newsletter at the link below: IEE's Quarterly Newsletter: January 2018 Institute and Faculty News Features:Shuji Nakamura awarded the 2018 Zayed Future Energy PrizeUnite to Light sends 9,000 solar lights to Rohingya refugees in... read more »
  • Jan 29
    2018
    Silicon photonics is revolutionizing optical technologies by enabling scalable manufacturing of densely integrated photonic systems on a chip. Such systems will be utilized in datacenter and high-performance computing interconnects, chemical and biomolecular sensors, and in numerous other applications where small form factor, low power consumption, and multi-functionality... read more »
  • Jan 26
    2018
    The RACELab in the Computer Science Department at UCSB directed by Professors Chandra Krintz and Rich Wolski recently won a best paper award at the IEEE Cluster conference for their work on the next generation of cloud computing systems.  The paper investigates how multiple "Big Data” analytics frameworks can be used more efficiently and effectively in Internet-of-Things... read more »
  • Jan 26
    2018
    Reflectin proteins drive dynamic tuning of color reflected from cells in squid skin. Microscopic image of the tunably reflective cells in squid skin (ca. 30 microns wide x 2-5 microns thick). Diffusion of a drop of neurotransmitter added at the upper right triggered activation of a wave of progressively changing colored reflectance. (The... read more »
  • Jan 23
    2018
    Imagine a roomful of 1,000 students all simultaneously experiencing an augmented reality lecture and demonstration. Or, how about riding in an autonomous vehicle that can detect, in real time and despite inclement weather, an accident or obstacle miles ahead? For those scenarios to be possible, we need a new, enhanced generation of wireless communication. And that is the... read more »
  • Jan 23
    2018
    Author: Shuji NakamuraDate: January 23, 2018 We are living in a world where, despite uncertainty in news and events, there is one trend that can be voiced with increasing certainty – the accelerating pace of the clean energy transformation and how this is reshaping the way in which the world generates electricity. Although we have known... read more »
  • Jan 17
    2018
    The new year is off to a strong start for UC Santa Barbara engineer Shuji Nakamura. The materials professor, who is also the research director for UCSB’s Solid State Lighting & Energy Electronics Center, has been awarded the 2018 Zayed Future Energy Prize (ZFEP). Nakamura is recognized in the Lifetime Achievement category, which honors “an individual with an... read more »
  • Jan 8
    2018
    Three UC Santa Barbara engineering faculty members have been named fellows of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for 2018. Professors Li-C. Wang, Clint Schow and Giovanni Vigna have been selected for their extraordinary accomplishments in their respective fields. IEEE is the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to... read more »
  • Jan 4
    2018
    Most of them have come on foot. Trekking through hills and across rivers from their home country and into Bangladesh, some 600,000 Rohingya refugees have fled Myanmar in recent months, seeking respite from violence and persecution. Many of them are women and children. When the sun descends, shrouding in darkness the sprawling refugee camps they now call home, new dangers... read more »
  • Jan 3
    2018
    One of the least energy efficient products in modern history, the incandescent light bulb dating back to the days of Thomas Edison, is about to be permanently retired in California as of Jan. 1, 2018, and in 2020 for the rest of the nation. California is demonstrating its environmental leadership once again by being the first state in the nation to move forward with... read more »
  • Jan 2
    2018
    Interstellar travel, light-driven spacecraft, suspended animation. It sounds like the formula for countless science fiction stories, but it could be reality in the not-so-far future if UC Santa Barbara researchers Philip Lubin and Joel Rothman get their way. “Humanity has dreamed of interstellar flight for more than 100 years. We are working on bringing this dream to... read more »
  • Dec 13
    2017
    Inventiveness may be its own reward, but the recognition that sometimes results can be pretty gratifying, too. Such is the case for Daniel J. Blumenthal, a professor in UC Santa Barbara’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), who has been named a 2017 fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He was cited for “demonstrating a highly prolific... read more »
  • Nov 6
    2017
    This report is an authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States. It represents the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990. The assessment concludes, based on extensive evidence, that it is extremely likely that human activities, especially emissions... read more »
  • Oct 31
    2017
    Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have reported significant advances in the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors based on carbon nanotube thin films that could be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.